the-top-chat-abbreviations-in-the-US-that-you-need-to-know

internet safety: chat abbreviations in the US you need to know

Slang words and abbreviations are ever-changing; being aware of the endless lists of terms proves impossible, which makes internet safety in schools particularly difficult. With more children and teenagers owning mobile devices, young people are becoming more and more in contact with this kind of language. More than three-quarters of all teens own cell phones, an increase of 45% from 2004, and an equivalent of 1 in 4 teenagers. With this there becomes a greater risk of cyberbullying, particularly considering one million children were harassed, threatened or subjected to other forms of cyberbullying behavior on Facebook in the last year.

mobile devices and cyberbullying

Mobile devices allow cyberbullying to take place anywhere, at any time. 10% of 55,000 students surveyed admitted to chatting, e-mailing or using instant messaging while at school. Through the use of cell-phones and increased use of mobile devices or computers in class, cyberbullying can take place during school hours. Without the use of classroom monitoring software, pupils are able to access their personal social media accounts, where most cyberbullying takes place.

social media

With knowledge that 25% of teens log in to social media ten times or more a day, it comes as no surprise that social media is now the number one activity on the web. Increased use of social media at home can cause a disruption in school; 6% of social-media-using teens have gotten into trouble at school because of an experience on a social media networking site.

Using classroom monitoring software in school can help detect cyberbullying terms being used and identifies those who are being bullied, as well as restricting the use of social media. Using keyword detection policies, Impero Education Pro is able to identify when slang or abbreviations are used on school devices.

bullying slang terms and abbreviations

There are many abbreviations that teachers and parents do not fully understand, and this can include terms that might be used whilst bullying an individual or used in response to cyberbullying.

Perpetrator:

RIHAD – Rot in hole and die

ESAD – Eat s*** and die

GTFO – Get the f*** out of here

STFU – Shut the f*** up

POS – Piece of s***

BIH – Burn in hell

 

Victim:

HMP – Help me please

BTSOOM – Beats the s*** out of me

LMA – Leave me alone

SAMAGAL – Stop annoying me and get a life

 

 

phrases you need to know for Internet safety

A/S/L? – Age/sex/location?

DITYID? – Did I tell you I’m distressed?

DWB – Don’t write back

ESAD – Eat s*** and die

GAL – Get a life

GTFO – Get the f*** out of here

HMP – Help me please

PAW – Parents are watching

STFU – Shut the f*** up

http://www.cyberbullying.us/cyberbullying_chat_abbreviations.pdf

 

BUF – Big Ugly Fat

IHU – I hate you

http://www.chatslang.com/terms/social_media

 

PNP – Party and Play (Drugs and sex)

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/top-twitter-abbreviations-you-need-know

 

POS – Piece of s***

http://nobullying.com/internet-slang/

 

BIH – Burn in hell

BTSOOM – Beats the sh** out of me

CD9 – Parents are around

FOAD – F*** off and die

FOB – F*** off B****

IHTFP – I hate this f****** place

LMA – Leave me alone

SAMAGAL – Stop annoying me and get a life

RIHAD – Rot in hole and die

 

 

Having a better understanding of these terms in conjunction with computer monitoring software can help facilitate better internet safety in schools. This allows young people to navigate the internet safely and free from the worry of being cyberbullied.

Find out more information about our internet safety solution for schools.

 

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